Cost of Dental Implants

Reviewed: May 25, 2016
By eHealthIQ
Cost of Dental Implants

Many people who are facing the loss of teeth or have already lost them are interested in dental implants. Unlike dentures, dental implants are permanent. The cost of dental implants is generally much higher than the cost of dentures, but there is a lot of confusion over how much implants actually cost. This is because not all implants are alike, and getting implants can mean anything from posts that simply hold removable dentures in place to full permanent false teeth that replace all the teeth in the mouth.

Full Implants

The cost to have all the teeth in your mouth replaced with traditional dental implants is the highest, and can approach $100,000, according to Consumer Guide to Dentistry. The organization gives a low-end estimate of $24,000. The difference in price could depend on where you have the dental work performed. Big city dentists may charge more than small town dentists, but larger dental offices may also offer discounts.

Lower Cost Full Mouth Implants

There is a type of implant that replaces all the teeth in the mouth yet costs much less than full implants. It’s called All-on-4, and involves four implants that support a full arch (top or bottom) of teeth. Because there are fewer implants involved, the cost overall is less than full implants, averaging around $20,000 to $30,000 across the United States.

Mini-Implants

Mini-Implants cost less because they are smaller, but they usually are used only as a method for holding removable dentures in place. They are generally too unstable to hold crowns (artificial teeth) permanently, and the mini-implants themselves can sometimes be removed by a dentist.

Other Factors That Can Affect Cost

The cost of implants can be higher if there is work that needs to be done on your teeth or jaws before the implants can be placed. For example, if there is not enough jaw bone present to support implants, a bone graft may have to be performed. Getting implants is a surgical procedure, so you should also be prepared for the cost of anesthesia and any other office or surgical fees. Dental insurance usually doesn’t cover implants, though it or your health insurance might cover some related costs such as prescription pain medications or dental office visits.

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